Understanding Scrapbook Styles and Sizes - Memo Scrap

Understanding Scrapbook Styles and Sizes

One of the first things you need to decide when you start scrapbooking is what type of scrapbook to buy. There are tons of options and confusing styles. Do you want a three-ring album or a zip-back album? Album size 12 “by 12” or 8 “by 8”? This quick overview looks at the pros and cons of each type of album, as well as the best ways to use them.

Scrapbook styles

The style of a scrapbook is primarily determined by its binding. The most common styles fall into these five categories:

After binding

A mail-bound album has mounting screws and uprights that are twisted together to bind the book. The page guards have holes for the posts to hold them securely in the scrapbook. Each page protector opens at the top, allowing finished album pages to be inserted directly into the protectors. Two pages can be inserted back-to-back into each release sheet to create a double-sided page. If you need to move pages, you can easily remove them from the guards. If you want to add extra page protections to your album, you can unscrew the mounting screws and add extension cords to lengthen posts.

Three rings

The three-ring album uses page guards that are usually identical to those used in publication-related albums. The three-ring album uses standard three-ring notebook-style hinges instead of posts to hold the page protectors in the book. D-ring albums allow the pages to lie flat in the book when closed. If you plan on frequently deleting or adding pages to your album, tri-ring albums offer the most flexibility.

Loop Strap

Looped albums use pages with staples around the edges. Plastic straps go through these braces and hold the pages in the book. Since the pages themselves are bound into a book, protective sleeves are pushed over the pages to close them. To add or remove pages from the album, remove the loop and loop knot.

Book binding

The bookbound scrapbook is bound like a traditional hardcover. Has a stitched and glued binding, where the pages are constantly intertwined. Pages cannot be added, but many bookbound albums have perforations that allow the pages to be removed so that there is more room on the remaining pages for larger items.

Other types

Other album bindings include handmade rings, spirals, ribbons or clasps. If you are trying to make your own album, you will not be limited to the sizes and types of bindings purchased from the store.

Scrapbook dimensions

When choosing the size of your scrapbook, think about the number of photos, memorabilia, jewelry, and magazines you plan to include on each page. Common sizes include:

12 by 12 inches

12 “by 12” albums are a popular choice and can be found in a wide variety of styles, colors and designs. A 12 by 12 double-page spread can easily accommodate 10 or more photographs as needed. Many people use a 12 “by 12” scrapbook as their primary family scrapbook.

8 ½ by 11 inches

8 ½ “x 11” albums contain fewer photographs than 12 “by 12” scrapbooks, but on the positive side, the paper for these smaller scrapbooks is cheaper. While not as popular as 12 x 12 books, a large number of 8 ½ x 11 books can be found in most local scrapbook stores. Several producers turned this album on its side and created an 11 by 8 ½ album.

8 by 8 and 6 by 6 inches

In the wake of the popularity of the 12 x 12 square album design, 8 x 8 and 6 x 6 inch albums have become a common choice for theme albums. These small books can be completed in less time, and the square page is great for photographs and journaling on the scrapbook page.

Other sizes

Mini-albums, thematic albums, and handmade albums can be of any size. You can make them yourself or find them made from metal cans, paper bags, or paper-covered chipboard. These little books are great gifts and usually contain photographs about one topic, event, or person.

Source : https://ru.crafts-fair.net/8231064-making-sense-of-scrapbook-styles-and-sizes

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